Our Health Library information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist our patients to learn more about their health. Our providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Warning Signs of Suicide

Topic Overview

Take any mention of suicide seriously. If someone you know is threatening suicide, get help right away. Health professionals should try to find out whether the person:

  • Has the means (weapons or medicines) available to do self-harm or to harm another person.
  • Has set a time and place to attempt suicide.
  • Thinks that there is no other way to end the pain.

If a suicide threat seems real, with a specific plan and the means at hand:

  • Call 911, a suicide hotline, or the police.
  • Stay with the person, or ask someone you trust to stay with the person, until the crisis has passed.
  • Encourage the person to seek professional help.
  • Don't argue with the person ("It's not as bad as you think") or challenge the person ("You're not the type to attempt suicide").
  • Tell the person that you don't want him or her to die. Talk about the situation as openly as possible.

You can take steps to prevent a suicide attempt. Be willing to listen, and help the person find help. Don't be afraid to ask "What is the matter?" or bring up the subject of suicide. There is no evidence that talking about suicide leads to suicidal thinking or suicide.

Remove all firearms from the home, or lock firearms and bullets up in different places. Get rid of any prescription and nonprescription medicines that are not being used.

For more information on preventing suicide, see the topic Suicidal Thoughts or Threats.

Warning signs of suicide

It is hard to know if a person is thinking about suicide. But you can look for warning signs and events that may make suicide more likely.

People may be more likely to attempt suicide if they:

  • Are male.
  • Have attempted suicide before.
  • Have a family member who has attempted suicide or who has died by suicide.
  • Have had or have mental health problems such as severe depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or anxiety.
  • Have been through family violence, including physical or sexual abuse.
  • Drink a lot of alcohol or use drugs.
  • Are older. Older Americans have the highest suicide rate of any age group. The rate is highest among white men ages 65 and older. Within this group, divorced and widowed men have the highest rate.
  • Are veterans or are members of the armed services.

Events that may put people at greater risk for suicide include:

  • Changes in life such as the death of a partner or good friend, retirement, divorce, or problems with money.
  • The diagnosis of a serious physical illness, such as cancer or heart disease, or a new physical disability.
  • Severe and long-lasting pain.
  • Loss of independence or not being able to get around without help.
  • Living alone or not having friends or social contacts.

Adults who are at risk may show these warning signs of suicide. They may:

  • Plan to or say they want to hurt or kill themselves or someone else.
  • Talk, write, read, or draw about death, including writing suicide notes and talking about items that can cause physical harm, such as pills, guns, or knives.
  • Say they have no hope, they feel trapped, or there is no point in "going on."
  • Buy guns or bullets, stockpile medicines, or take other action to prepare for a suicide attempt. They may have a new interest in guns or other weapons.
  • Drink more alcohol or use drugs, including prescription medicines.
  • No longer want to see people and want to be alone a lot.
  • No longer take care of themselves or follow medical advice.
  • Give away their things and/or hurry to complete a will.

The warning signs in children, teens, and young adults may be different. They include running away from home or doing risky or dangerous things, such as drunk driving.

Take any mention of suicide seriously. If someone you know is threatening suicide, get help right away. To learn more, see Suicidal Thoughts or Threats.

Credits

Current as of: September 23, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Christine R. Maldonado PhD - Behavioral Health

Call Us At (913) 384-4990

COVID-19 Update

Women’s Care is closely following the most up-to-date announcements and information on the known cases of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). Because this information is always changing, we will be monitoring all updates from the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control. 

If you are experiencing a fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath, persistent chest pain or pressure, any other COVID Coronavirus or flu symptoms, or had COVID exposure, please make sure to contact us via phone prior to your appointment. You may also contact us for any additional questions by calling our office at (913) 384-4990. We are accepting appointments, however we are currently not allowing guests with the exception of ONLY allowing ONE guest for patients’ new OB visit and ultrasound, 20 week anatomy ultrasound, and 3D ultrasound. Infants and children are not allowed into our office at this time. 

Here are a few additional resources as well: 

World Health Organization
Centers for Disease Control

We appreciate your patience during this time, look forward to continuing to serve our community!

site logo